Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association

Members of the Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association are trained by Delta in First AidThis was my second visit to the Guernsey Hard of Hearing. They’re such a keen bunch.

When I was originally asked to present a first aid course to the association, I was a bit apprehensive. Mostly because of my inability to sign. I wasn’t sure if I could communicate effectively to the group.

An amazing signer

In stepped Anne who is not deaf but an amazing signer. All my fears were allayed.

A great group

My belief is that no-one in our society should be ever overlooked. Everyone has the right to learn and the hard of hearing have exactly the same needs as the rest of society and the ability to learn life saving skills is key.

A keen group of people of all ages were waiting for me at the Ron Short Centre at Beau Sejour.

By the end of the evening they couldn’t have been more grateful for the training.Members of the Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association are trained in First Aid by Dawn Bagnall of Delta

It kind of makes you feel a little inadequate, but humbled. They made every effort to learn, asked lots of questions and were very involved.

Help the Heroes

Given the Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association is not flush with money I made no charge for the training.

You can imagine how taken aback, surprised and delighted I was when they made a donation to my Help for Heroes fundraising efforts.

My thanks go to all of them.

Feedback

The feedback has been amazing too.

“Thank you Dawn for a really useful First Aid demonstration last night at the Ron Short Centre.

We all hope we will do a good job in an emergency but still hope it won’t happen! Thanks from all at the Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association”.Guernsey Hard of Hearing Association

(The two main images have been provided by courtesy of The Guernsey Press Company Limited)

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’

Delta’s new battle bus

Delta Training has their new sign written vehicle (Bagger's Battle Bus)
‘Well, the time had come to change the vehicle,’ said Dawn Bagnall, Proprietor of Delta Training and Consultancy. ‘Our trusty Audi had had its day and couldn’t cope anymore with the amount of equipment we needed to carry.’

A white van?

Dawn went in search for a vehicle to meet the needs of Delta Training, but the thought of driving around in the proverbial white van didn’t quite hit the spot to say the least.

‘Ford was never really on the radar, not sure why. But my good friend Saffi said it was worth a look. So off we went and there it was, on the forecourt. I knew as soon as I clapped eyes on it that it was perfect for Delta! Big, chunky, versatile and smart – it fitted the bill, perfectly!

‘After a test drive and scaring ten bells out of James, the salesman, I made the decision to commit myself. To be honest, it was me that probably needed committing!

‘The new Ford Tourneo Grand Connect Titanium is a bit of a mouthful, so we call it “Baggers’Battle Bus”. Equally a mouthful, but much more fun.

‘Bagger’s Battle Bus meets all expectations. It’s had the company logo fitted by Smith Signs and what a great job they’ve done. The criteria was for it to be bold and stand out. I want everyone to know about Delta Training and Consultancy.

‘Do please keep an eye out for me on the road, toot if you like it!!

‘Ah, yes, “the bill”. Less said….’

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’

Three courses in one

Condor Express arrives from St MaloReceiving a phone call from a English lady living in France wasn’t quite what we were expecting!

Can Delta Training help?

Maggie had been searching the Internet for a training company that could help with her dilemma.

Living in France with her son and father, Maggie, an RMN (Registered Mental Nurse), was hoping to return to the workplace but needed some key skills up-dating.

Maggie had tried several UK companies only to find none of them interested in training a single person in three key areas in 24hrs.

And then Maggie found Delta Training and Consultancy in Guernsey.

Not a Problem

‘Can you help?’ Maggie asked. ‘Not a problem,’ was the immediate reply from Delta Training’s proprietor, Dawn Bagnall. ‘What do you need?’

The three subjects Maggie needed were Moving & Handling, Basic Life Support and De-Fibrillation.

48 hours later

Just 48 hours after arriving on the Condor Express from St Malo, Maggie was on her way to Guernsey. Inside 24 hours of arriving in Guernsey, mostly spent with Dawn Bagnall in the training room, Maggie was returning to France clutching the three certificates she needed for her return to work.

So grateful

Maggie was delighted, grateful and astonished that Delta Training and Consultancy was able to cover exactly what she needed and in such a concentrated manner without any corners being cut.

Dawn Bagnall said, ‘There really is no such thing as a job too small. It’s all about customer service and meeting needs. That’s what makes training such fun – you just never know what’s going to turn up. It’s exciting and keeps us on our toes!

‘Thank you, Maggie,’ added Dawn, ‘for choosing Delta Training and Consultancy. Please keep in touch.’

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’

Remembering

Dawn Bagnall, exhausted, emotional and pensive after the Big Battlefield Bike Ride 2014Having returned from the Big Battlefield Bike Ride, Dawn was as equally exhausted and exhilarated as she was pensive and emotional.

Monday 2 June – Brussels to Mons

6.00am and we’re up for breakfast. With all cyclists clad in Lycra (are there laws against some people wearing Lycra?) we were bussed to the start point in the centre of Brussels to be re-united with our bikes.

After speeches, we were off heading for Mons, a 55 mile ride ‘to find our riding legs’, which, I was told, are somewhere above my feet!

The outbreak of World War 1 (WW1)

This ride concentrated on the outbreak of WWI from the prospective of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). Excitement and banter were good and the weather was on our side.

At the water stops, members of the International Guild of Battlefield Guides (IGBG) passionately recounted stories bringing history alive so much so that our imaginations were there, living the reality as it happened.

We visited the precise spot in Casteau where the first shot by a British serviceman was fired by Corporal Edward Thomas. The first shot in almost a century.

Police escort

From Mons, the Belgium police insisted on giving us an escort. ‘It would be an honour,’ they said. So special.

At the joint British and German St. Symphorien Cemetery, a short ceremony was held. This cemetery contains the first (21 August 1914) and the last (11 November 1918) BEF casualties and the first VC winner of WWI.

Arriving in Mons, the Mayor held a reception for us in the town hall with free beer. Just what we needed after a day in the saddle.

More speeches were made and a special guest speaker, SACEUR (Supreme Allied Commander Europe) had taken the time to come and thank us and wish us all good luck. A busy man. Nice touch. Good day had by all.

Tuesday 3 June – Mons to Arras

Fed and watered, we made our way to Arras. The route was full of historical stops led by the IGBG recounting stories of Cavalry charges and desperate infantry actions of rescuing artillery pieces whilst under close range fire at Elouges.

Another 2 VCs were won here. Real ‘boys own’ stuff.

We visited the Orange Trench Cemetery and the Arras Memorial to the Missing of 1917. Our wounded riders laid wreaths as the peddling Padré gave a poignant sermon that reached deep into the heart.

Having cycled 70 miles to Arras I found my riding legs! They even gave me messages like stop! What are you doing to us? A beer or two was required; purely medicinal.

We have laughed and cried. It’s only day 2 on the bike, but I knew I was going to be a physical and emotional wreck by the end of the week.

Wednesday 4 June – Arras to Amiens

It started with light rain and by the time breakfast was over it was pouring. Not what we needed, but the task had to be completed. So off we went heading to Amiens.

I cycled alongside pedalling General. We chatted and I even gave him a 20 min lesson in De-fibrillation. Work’s never too far away! He seemed to enjoy it but he hasn’t received the invoice yet…

We stopped at Hawthorn Ridge where a massive mine had exploded on 1 July 1916 when the ill-fated Lancashire Fusiliers attacked. This was famously filmed by Geoffrey Malins.

Emotional Killer

Replenished and feeling a little better after another water stop we made our way to Thiepval Memorial. This was an emotional killer for me. 72,000 names of missing in the Battle of the Somme. Men who have no graves. Nowhere for their families to visit or have closure.

The Padré asked us to find our surname and think of that person so he had someone to remember him. I looked hard, and found BAGNALL T. The name and initial of my late father, the only Bagnall amongst the 72,000 others. I prayed and wondered for the rest of the day what that man was like and how he may have met his fate. A tragedy of epic proportions.

Distance covered today was 44 miles. Parts of me are starting to go numb. Maybe that’s a good thing.

Thursday 5 June – Amiens to Compiegne

An 8am start today and it’s only a 60 mile peddle to Compiegne! Today is dedicated to Dominion and Allied Nations.

Having our Australian Allies cycling along side us it was only right to pay tribute to their fallen. These brave men were the ones who stopped the German spring offensive on the 24-27 April 1918. They were also instrumental in the start of the final Allied Offensive attack on 8 August 1918, known as ‘Black Day of the German Army’.

The families of these soldiers live mostly on the other side of the world. I wondered how many would ever have the opportunity to come and pay their respects. I doubt many. It is said that the wives of these brave men would sit at the train stations at home, day in day out for many years in the hope of their return. It is not just the soldier that suffers.

Despite the tears and sadness whilst peddling, morale remained high and banter was good. Thank God for Ibuprofen as I was suffering pain in places that I didn’t know existed! And I’m a clinician.

Compiegne is a beautiful old town and the reception was amazing. A piper and bugler greeted together with a large cold beer.

Friday 6 June – Compeigne to Paris

Our last day pedalling in France. The sun shone upon us. A mere 52 miles today. Huh, piece of cake.

Today is the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Landings.

As this is a short day on the bike, we have to be in central Paris by 3pm. We hear first about Nery where the British Cavalry managed to turn the tables on the Germans and defeat them after a surprise attack.

Thick fog

Then it was the battle of the Marne and the advance to and over the Ainse, the beginning of trench warfare. Here, there’s an amazing story of a British patrol which came across a German Battalion in thick fog. The Officer in charge of the patrol had fallen down a ravine leaving the Corporal in charge.

On his return to his unit the Corporal told the Officer Commanding (OC) the Germans were advancing. The OC dismissed this intelligence until the young soldier produced a German Army cape and sword as evidence. Result? Countless British lives were saved. Amazing. I stood on the very spot where this took place. Surreal. I was encapsulated.

Paris is in sight

The pedal into Paris was a little stressful with traffic being the biggest problem. But we stuck together as a team and picked our way to the meeting point in a park. From here, all 250 of us cycled up the Champs Elysé, around the Arc de Triomphe and into Les Invalides. A magnificent building where we were met by a French General and friends and family. A wonderful and emotional site.

It’s over

It’s over. The ride was complete.

Whilst remembering, I have to congratulate all those who took part in the BBBR and shared their stories and journey with me. Next year…

Please help by donating

I’d be so grateful if you’d help by donating whatever you can afford. Just click on the link– it’s so easy.

Thank you.

Dawn Bagnall
 

To enquire about a Delta training course

H4H LOGO 2Please call 07839 123 011 or complete the enquiry form.

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’

Help for Heroes – BBBR

Dawn Bagnall joins the cycle ride to raise funds for Help for HeroesDawn Bagnall, proprietor of Delta Training and Consultancy, will be taking part in the Help for Heroes ‘Big Battlefield Bike Ride’.

“This is the second time I have taken part in the Big Battlefield Bike Ride (BBBR).

Why?

“Last year I decided I needed a challenge, and what better way than to do this? To cycle long distances whilst raising money for a charity so close to my heart.

“Having served unscathed in the Military for 22 years, why not give something to the lads and lasses who haven’t been as fortunate as me?

“Last year I cycled from Paris to London, 450 miles in 6 days. It hurt! But what an amazing and humbling experience. Cycling with injured soldiers really puts life into perspective.

Brussels to Paris – 350 miles with 250 Cyclists

“After last year’s punishing ride, I decided to do it again! This year, Sunday 1st June, I’m cycling from Brussels to Paris with 250 cyclists, some of whom are injured veterans of the British Armed Forces, US and Canadian Forces and for the first time the Australian Armed Forces.

“The ride is 350 miles.

“On each day we’ll be stopping at Military cemeteries to have a service to pay our respects to the fallen. An emotional and difficult time for lots of people taking part.

“The most amazing thing about the ride is how a large group of strangers can come together for 6 days and form a bond like a family, supporting each other physically and emotionally. This shows the spirit of human kind.”

Paris to London

“From Paris we make our way back to Blackheath, just outside London. The following day, 8th June, we meet up with 3,000 other cyclists and take part in the Hero Ride, 10 miles through London (I think I can just about manage that) with the grand finalé at Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall.Help for Heroes“This is by far the most awe inspiring event I have ever had the pleasure to take part in.”

Please help by donating

I’d be so grateful if you’d help by donating whatever you can afford. Just click on the link– it’s so easy.

Thank you.

Dawn Bagnall
 

To enquire about a Delta training course

H4H LOGO 2Please call 07839 123 011 or complete the enquiry form.

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’

Island FM

For those who listen to Island FM, you’ll probably have heard two of our adverts ringing their way through the ether.

The ads are planned to run for a month.

First Aid at Work

The first Island FM advert was for First Aid in the work place:

First Aid at Home

The Second Island FM advert was for First Aid in home:

Feedback and Ideas – please

If you have any feedback on these ads, or ideas for future ads, please let us know by leaving a comment. Thank you!
 

To enquire about a Delta Training course

Please call 07839 123 011 or complete the enquiry form.

Delta Training and Consultancy

‘Bringing training to the heart of the community’